AN AFRICAN PATHWAY TO SUSTAINABLE MOBILITY

From Insights Movinon

One line description: AN AFRICAN PATHWAY TO SUSTAINABLE MOBILITY

Description: How can we achieve a homegrown, actionable roadmap for transformation and development in sustainable mobility and, more broadly, sustainable development in Africa ?

  • Identify the specific challenges of sustainable transport infrastructure in Africa (ex: financing, development, adaptation, maintenance, etc).
  • Determine the key levers for electrified mobility in Africa regarding supply chain, B2C transport and access to energy.
  • Consider how African sustainable solutions could be scaled or “globalized” and shared with the rest of the world

Image:

Pexels-photo-434450.jpeg

Organization: L'OREILLE

Participants:

Category: MULTIMODAL SOCIETY, ACCELERATE CHANGE

Theme: electrification (vehicle & infra), financing innovation, new business model

Leader: BERNARD Claire-marie, GRAS Stéphan-Eloïse

Facilitator: BERGERON Josée-Anne

Expert: GAUTHIER Aimée, SOUSSI Rym, WHALE Joshua

Action:

Email or forum discussion :

Chat discussion canal : https://chat.fabmob.io/channel/movinonconf

Next Step :

Feel free to comment, complete and join this initiative !

Introduction

FROM THE MINUTES 2018

Sandwiched between the trucks, cars and motorcycles whizzing by, a crowd gathers at a random spot on the side of the busy road. This is a bus stop. No sign, bench, or shelter from the elements. The crowd waits for mini-buses that pass by at undetermined times, if at all. This is a daily reality for many people using transit systems in Africa. “Roughly 80% of the economy in Africa is informal and 90% of the vehicle fleet is old vehicles from the developing world,” says Stéphan-Eloïse Gras. Paratransit (informal operators) working independently make up the majority of the transit systems in African cities. The creation of transportation systems, rather than a reliance on paratransit, is the next step for Africa. Systems have economic, ecological and social benefits for Africa, resulting in emissions reduction, increased safety, expanded access to transportation, decreased shipping costs and increased incomes.

BIG CONTINENT, BIG PLANS

As experts in mobility and infrastructure from around the world, Movin’On participants suggested some actions for a systematic approach to transit: → Create monetary incentives for consumers and transport companies

→ Introduce a fair-trade scheme to get citizens on board with new systems

→ Establish clear rights, responsibilities and duties between government and the transit operators

→ Approach large financial institutions for assistance

→ Gather the necessary data to develop a collaborative transportation platform for monitoring, evaluating and planning the transit systems

→ Create an application to integrate all the informal transportation modes so that informal transit operators can log their routes, transactions and driving times

→ Design a customer information system to provide more access to freight transportation


"We need to look at transit not as nodes but as networks. Cairo does not know what transportation networks look like. They know the vehicles but not the systems." - Mohamed Hegazy


ELECTRIFICATION OF MOTOS IN KIGALI

In Kigali, Rwanda, there are 30,000 petrol-based motorcycle taxis (motos) and they outnumber all other transportation vehicles, combined. The use of petrol-based motos causes financial problems for drivers. To improve their situation, Ampersand created a formal system of electric motorbike taxis.

PROBLEMS WITH PETROL-BASED MOTOS:
  • A moto costs roughly $1,600 to purchase
  • Expensive fuel (upwards of $1,780 a year)
  • Drivers cover long distances (up to 190 km per day)
  • Low driver profits of roughly $510 per year
BENEFITS OF ELECTRIC MOTOS:
  • Upfront cost of electric motorcycles is cheaper than petrol motorcycles ($200-$400 cheaper)
  • Fuel costs are lower, which roughly doubles the drivers’ incomes
  • 9 x decrease in respiratory illness mortality
  • 75% reduction in GHG emissions


AFRICAN TRANSIT SYSTEMS BY THE NUMBERS
  • Today, Africa’s fossil-fuel CO2 emissions is less than 6.6%
  • 32% of Africa is powered by electricity
  • In 2100, 40% of all humans will be African


TRANSFORMATION OF THE DAR ES SALAAM TRANSIT SYSTEM

In Dar es Salaam, the investment in new, cleaner buses and an efficient, reliable system including formal bus stops allowed it to:

  • Carry 200,000 passengers a day
  • Design formal bus stops to be efficient and clean
  • Recover waterfront property, that is now designed for pedestrian accessibility to bus stations
  • Walk and cycle downtown due to less traffic congestion and better pedestrian related infrastructure