CITYZEN, HUMANIZING TOMORROW’S CITIES

From Insights Movinon

One line description: CITYZEN, HUMANIZING TOMORROW’S CITIES

Description: How to increase quality of life and humanize the city by developing sustainable urban mobility solutions for citizens?

  • Learn to design and develop each of the various elements necessary for humanized, sustainable urban mobility (ex: political leadership & commitment, suitable infrastructure budget, etc).
  • Imagine how to build sustainable, accessible, quality mobility that supports a city’s character as vehicular technologies and mobility business models continue their rapid evolution.
  • Consider how to ensure the primacy of electric vehicles as shared mobility continues to expand

Image:

Pexels-photo-220444.jpeg

Organization: Electric Mobility Canada

Participants:

Category: DECARBONIZATION AND AIR QUALITY, MULTIMODAL SOCIETY

Theme: electrification (vehicle & infra), city

Leader: KARGAS Catherine

Facilitator: ELLOUK Lisa

Expert: PAPANDREOU Timothy, HARRIS Danielle

Action:

Email or forum discussion :

Chat discussion canal : https://chat.fabmob.io/channel/movinonconf

Next Step :

Feel free to comment, complete and join this initiative !

FROM THE MINUTES 2018

Our health as individuals and the health of our planet pay dearly for rising CO2 emissions from fossil fuel-driven vehicles. “The cost per household of congestion is already very significant — in the thousands per year. And moving toward 2030 we can expect these numbers to inflate in a very important way,” declares Catherine Kargas. She stresses the need to address vehicle issues such as low seat-occupation rates, low utilization rates, wasted parking lot land use and the enormous cost to individuals to buy, use and park cars.


CONNECTING PEOPLE TO OPPORTUNITIES

Mobility can be seen as a way to cultivate spaces where people can make connections, and not just getting people from A to B. “We need to think about new metrics: what are the motivations that people have to take trips?” wonders Danielle Harris. She and her colleagues consider key factors such as the importance to some parents of driving their kids to school, or accommodating those who are intimidated by driving a bike in traffic or who are unable to handle a crowded bus. “We as a city needed to figure out what was our North Star.” In doing so, they developed guiding principles for emerging mobility that included measuring the impact on labour, transit, sustainability, safety, disabled access and equitable access.


FOCUS ON THE MIDDLE GROUND

“There’s a blur between the car on the left, and public transport on the far right; and everything in the middle is becoming much more fluid and connected,” explains Tim Papandreu. He also noticed that bikes (with and without docks), e-scooters and car-sharing solutions are prevailing as popular alternative public mobility solutions. He stresses the importance of inclusivity, citing the minority of the population who don’t have credit cards and smartphones who would be precluded from certain mobility services. Not only that, 99% of these services are inaccessible to people with disabilities, both visible and invisible. “The challenge is that we have incredibly good ideas in front of us, but we face persistent and consistent barriers that we need to figure out new ways to overcome.”


COSMOPOLITAN CORRELATION

Montreal, London and Bangkok have a lot in common:

  • Great cities : OK
  • Great food : OK
  • Great nightlife : OK
  • Great transportation : Well... almost. What are the pain points among these cities’ public transportation systems, and what sustainable mobility solutions can be adopted?


Here is some of what was pitched by Movin'On participants:

  • Montreal: Use reverse incentive to encourage habit change, with toll roads that you pay to use during peak hours but get paid to use after-hours.
  • London: Address the last mile problem by unifying services such as bikesharing and taxis, and partner with Amazon and other online sellers to add pickup points.
  • Bangkok: Have the transit authority partner with a large company and name a transport line after the company. This company can help fund the improvement of the network while generating ad revenue and visibility for itself.