HUMAN-CENTERED DESIGN IN THE AGE OF SUSTAINABLE MOBILITY

From Insights Movinon

One line description: HUMAN-CENTERED DESIGN IN THE AGE OF SUSTAINABLE MOBILITY

Description: How will design influence the consumer journey through our new sustainable mobility future?

  • Explore how urban zones and urban vehicles can be designed in tandem to complement each other using a systems design approach.
  • Visualize what specialized vehicles (school bus, ambulance, police car, etc.) would look like if they were designed specifically to do that task in a particular urban setting.
  • Reflect on how to include the human element of Desire, however irrational, in the design of the mobility of the future.

Image:

Pexels-photo-436775.jpeg

Organization: ArtCenter College of Design, College for Creative Studies

Participants:

Category: INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES, ACCELERATE CHANGE

Theme: city, bottom up & Peer2Peer

Leader: EBEL Ben

Facilitator: MALZ Jessica

Expert: REED Stewart, ZAMMIT Raphael, WILBUR Jason

Action:

Email or forum discussion :

Chat discussion canal : https://chat.fabmob.io/channel/movinonconf

Next Step :

Feel free to comment, complete and join this initiative !

FROM THE MINUTES 2018

In sunny Pasadena, California, 88.6% of households own at least one car, just below the national average of 90.9%. Yet, within the young generation of designers at the Transportation Design Department of the Pasadena Art Center, some international students didn’t even have a driver’s licence until they came to America, while others came from families that never owned a car. What happens when car designers don’t follow the status quo? They put people first when designing their concepts. Participants at Movin’On 2018 were asked to do the same.

IMAGINE THE PROBLEMS (AND THEN SOLVE THEM)

To help answer questions about the future of mobility, Nick Renner’s definition of innovation is particularly relevant: innovation is a solution to an existing problem or a solution to a problem that doesn’t exist yet. Transportation designers, urban planners, architects, engineers and technology specialists must expand their views to try to predict then solve tomorrow’s mobility problems.


One way is to consider these three future realities:

Possible : What could happen Probable : What is most likely to happen Preferred : The desired outcome

Some of Nick's sage advice:

→ Such down the critic in your head and imagine what you want to happen. Remember: you will not only design for the next five or 10 years, but for the next 25 to 50.


→ Put the users at the core of your thoughts — make them your guide. Find a valuable unique experience you can create for them.